Rep. William Jefferson and Situational Journalism


By: Jim Kouri, CPP

In a previous article, I wrote about how the news media practice situational journalism — slanting coverage of a news story depending on whom the subject is. I used Rep. Patrick Kennedy’s admitted drug addiction story and Rush Limbaugh’s bout with addiction as an example. In Limbaugh’s case the story was about crime and prosecution. In Kennedy’s case it was about the dangers of Ambien and painkillers, and the difficulties of drug rehabilitation.

Another example is Rep. Tom DeLay’s legal problems and Rep. William Jefferson’s impending legal battle.

Two weeks ago, I reported on a businessman who paid bribes to Rep. William Jefferson (D-LA) pleading guilty to a two-count indictment charging him with conspiracy to commit bribery and the payment of bribes to a public official.

Vernon L. Jackson, 53, of Louisville, Kentucky, entered his plea in US District Court in Alexandria, VA. Jackson faces up to 20 years in prison and a fine of up to $500,000, under the terms of his plea agreement with prosecutors. Also, as part of his plea, Jackson has agreed to cooperate with law enforcement officials in an ongoing probe of public corruption related to telecommunications deals in Africa and elsewhere.

According to criminal court documents, from 1998 through this year, Jackson had been the Chairman and CEO of iGate, Inc., a Kentucky firm developing technology which is designed to transmit data, audio, and video communications over copper wire. In his plea, Jackson admits that in 2000, he was introduced to Rep. Jefferson, who was active in promoting US trade and business in Africa with other members of the Black Caucus.

Rep. Jefferson allegedly provided official assistance to Jackson in persuading the US Army to test iGate’s broadband two-way technology and other iGate products. Jefferson’s official assistance led to the placement of iGate on the US General Services Administration schedule, making iGate products eligible for use in various federal contracts. Ultimately, iGate’s products were used by the US Army at Fort Stewart, Georgia.

Jackson further admits that in early 2001, Rep. Jefferson told him that he would not continue to provide official assistance to Jackson’s company, iGate, unless Jackson agreed to pay a nominee company ostensibly maintained in the names of Rep. Jefferson’s spouse and children. Jackson agreed and signed a consulting services agreement committing iGate to pay Jefferson’s shadow company various things of value, thereby concealing Jackson’s payments in exchange for Jefferson’s performance of official acts in aiding iGate’s business in Africa and elsewhere.

According to the FBI, Jackson made monthly payments of $7,500 to Jefferson, as well as a percentage of Jackson’s gross sales. Rep. Jefferson also received a percentage of capital investments raised for iGate, and options for iGate stock.

In his plea, Jackson admitted to allowing over $400,000 to be paid to the Jefferson family company and that the consulting services agreement was designed to conceal the illegal nature of the payments demanded by Rep. Jefferson.

In return for the agreement by Jackson to pay “things of value,” Rep. Jefferson agreed to perform numerous official acts in furtherance of iGate’s business, including efforts to influence high-ranking officials in Nigeria, Ghana, Cameroon and elsewhere through official correspondence and in-person meetings; Jefferson’s travel to those countries to setup these meetings; and meetings with personnel of the Export-Import Bank of the United States, the official export credit agency of the United
States, in order to help with potential financing for iGate business deals in those countries.

As part of the investigation, the US home of the Vice President of Nigeria was searched and during a raid on Rep. Jefferson’s home, FBI agents say that they found almost $100,000.00 in cash in Jefferson’s freezer.

Then the FBI, judge’s warrant in hand, searched Rep. Jefferson’s congressional office in Washington, DC. and the story became the FBI and Justice Department’s alleged abuse of power. In Rep. Tom DeLay’s case, the news media ignored the out-of-control prosecutor’s shenanigans and focused on the Democrat strategy of taking down DeLay. In Jefferson’s case, the news media are pushing the Democrat’s strategy of taking the focus off an alleged crook and putting the focus on the FBI agents
investigating the case.

In “situational journalism” coverage of Republican corruption feeds into the Democrat Party talking point of a “culture of corruption.” In the coverage of Democrat corruption, the news media help the Democrats by putting the cops on trial instead of the crooked politician who stuffs his freezer with his ill-gotten gains alongside the Bird’s Eye frozen peas. In “situational journalism,” the media take on the role of defense attorney if a Democrat is accused of criminal acts, while they take on
the role of prosecutor if a Republican is accused.



Jim Kouri, CPP is currently fifth vice-president of the National Association of Chiefs of Police and he’s a staff writer for the New Media Alliance (thenma.org). He’s former chief at a New York City housing project in Washington Heights nicknamed “Crack City” by reporters covering the drug war in the 1980s. In addition, he served as director of public safety at a New Jersey university and director of security for several major organizations. He’s also served on the National Drug Task Force and trained police and security officers throughout the country. Kouri writes for many police and security magazines including Chief of Police, Police Times, The Narc Officer and others. He’s a news writer for TheConservativeVoice.Com. He’s also a columnist for AmericanDaily.Com, MensNewsDaily.Com, MichNews.Com, and he’s syndicated by AXcessNews.Com. He’s appeared as on-air commentator for over 100 TV and radio news and talk shows including Oprah, McLaughlin Report, CNN Headline News, MTV, Fox News, etc. His book Assume The Position is available at Amazon.Com. Kouri’s own website is located at http://jimkouri.us

About The Author Jim Kouri, CPP:
Jim Kouri, CPP is currently fifth vice-president of the National Association of Chiefs of Police and he's a columnist for The Examiner (examiner.com) and New Media Alliance (thenma.org). In addition, he's a blogger for the Cheyenne, Wyoming Fox News Radio affiliate KGAB (www.kgab.com). Kouri also serves as political advisor for Emmy and Golden Globe winning actor Michael Moriarty. He's former chief at a New York City housing project in Washington Heights nicknamed "Crack City" by reporters covering the drug war in the 1980s. In addition, he served as director of public safety at a New Jersey university and director of security for several major organizations. He's also served on the National Drug Task Force and trained police and security officers throughout the country. Kouri writes for many police and security magazines including Chief of Police, Police Times, The Narc Officer and others. He's a news writer and columnist for AmericanDaily.Com, MensNewsDaily.Com, MichNews.Com, and he's syndicated by AXcessNews.Com. Kouri appears regularly as on-air commentator for over 100 TV and radio news and talk shows including Fox News Channel, Oprah, McLaughlin Report, CNN Headline News, MTV, etc. To subscribe to Kouri's newsletter write to COPmagazine@aol.com and write "Subscription" on the subject line.
Website:http://jimkouri.us

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