FBI Releases Its 2006 Crime Statistics on Monday


By: Jim Kouri, CPP

(The National Association of Chiefs of Police released this report from the Federal Bureau of Investigation on Monday, September 24, 2007. It is based on the FBI’s annual Uniform Crime Report (UCR.)

For the second consecutive year, the estimated number of violent crimes in the nation increased, and for the fourth year in a row, the estimated number of property crimes decreased.

According to statistics released today by the FBI, the estimated volume of violent crime increased 1.9 percent, and the estimated volume of property crime decreased 1.9 percent in 2006 when compared with 2005 figures. The estimated rate of violent crime was 473.5 occurrences per 100,000 inhabitants (a 1.0-percent increase when the 2006 and 2005 rates were compared), and the estimated rate of property crime was 3,334.5 per 100,000 inhabitants (a 2.8-percent decline).

The FBI presented these data today in the 2006 edition of Crime in the United States, a statistical compilation of offense and arrest data as reported by law enforcement agencies throughout the nation. The FBI collected these data via the Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program.

The UCR Program gathers offense data for violent and property crimes. Violent crimes are the offenses of murder and nonnegligent manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault; property crimes are the offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, motor vehicle theft, and arson. (Though the FBI classifies arson as a property crime, it does not estimate arson data because of variations in the level of participation at the agency level. Consequently, arson is not included in the estimated property crime total.) The Program also collects arrest data for violent and property crimes as well as 21 additional offenses that include all other offenses except traffic violations.

In 2006, more than 17,500 city, county, college and university, state, tribal, and federal agencies voluntarily participated in the UCR Program. These agencies represented 94.2 percent of the nation’s population. A summary of the crime statistics presented in Crime in the United States, 2006, follows:

Nationwide, there were an estimated 1,417,745 violent crimes reported in 2006.
Of the violent crimes, the estimated number of murders and nonnegligent manslaughters increased 1.8 percent, and the estimated number of robberies increased 7.2 percent in 2006 when compared with 2005 data. The estimated number of aggravated assaults decreased 0.2 percent, and the estimated number of forcible rapes declined 2.0 percent.
There were an estimated 9,983,568 property crimes, excluding arson, reported nationwide in 2006.

Of the property crimes, burglary was the only offense to show an increase (1.3 percent) in volume when 2006 data were compared with the 2005 data. The estimated number of larceny-thefts decreased 2.6 percent, and the estimated number of motor vehicle thefts declined 3.5 percent.

In 2006, excluding arson, victims of property crimes collectively lost an estimated $17.6 billion: thefts of motor vehicles resulted in losses of more than $7.9 billion, larceny-thefts resulted in losses of $5.6 billion, and burglaries, $4.0 billion.

Slightly more than 44 percent (44.3) of violent crimes and 15.8 percent of property crimes were cleared by arrest or exceptional means by the nation’s law enforcement agencies in 2006.

A total of 13,943 law enforcement agencies reported 69,055 arson offenses to the UCR Program in 2006.

The number of arsons reported in 2006 increased 2.1 percent when compared with the number of arsons reported in 2005.

The number of arsons reported in 2006 increased 2.1 percent when compared with the number of arsons reported in 2005.

The average dollar loss for arson offenses was $13,325 per incident.

The FBI estimated that law enforcement agencies nationwide made 14,380,370 arrests in 2006, excluding those for traffic offenses.

Law enforcement agencies made 4,832.5 arrests for each 100,000 in population nationwide for the 29 offenses for which the UCR Program collects arrest data.

The arrest rate for violent crime was 207.0 arrests per 100,000 inhabitants; for property crime, the rate was 524.5.

The rate of arrests for murder and nonnegligent manslaughter in 2006 was 4.5 per 100,000 in population. The rate of arrests for forcible rape was 8.2; for robbery, 43.2; and for aggravated assault, 151.1.

Of the property crimes, law enforcement made 102.5 arrests for burglary for each 100,000 in population, 370.0 for larceny-theft, 46.5 for motor vehicle theft, and 5.5 for arson.

In addition to offense and arrest data, Crime in the United States, 2006, contains information regarding the staffing levels of more than 14,000 college and university, city, county, state, and tribal law enforcement agencies as of October 31, 2006. These agencies reported that, collectively, they employed 683,396 sworn officers and 303,729 civilians, which was a rate of 3.5 employees for each 1,000 inhabitants.



Jim Kouri, CPP is currently fifth vice-president of the National Association of Chiefs of Police and he’s a staff writer for the New Media Alliance (thenma.org). Kouri also serves as political advisor for Emmy and Golden Globe winning actor Michael Moriarty.

He’s former chief at a New York City housing project in Washington Heights nicknamed “Crack City” by reporters covering the drug war in the 1980s. In addition, he served as director of public safety at a New Jersey university and director of security for several major organizations. He’s also served on the National Drug Task Force and trained police and security officers throughout the country. Kouri writes for many police and security magazines including Chief of Police, Police Times, The Narc Officer and others. He’s a news writer for TheConservativeVoice.Com and PHXnews.com. He’s also a columnist for AmericanDaily.Com, MensNewsDaily.Com, MichNews.Com, and he’s syndicated by AXcessNews.Com. He’s appeared as on-air commentator for over 100 TV and radio news and talk shows including Oprah, McLaughlin Report, CNN Headline News, MTV, Fox News, etc. His book Assume The Position is available at Amazon.Com. Kouri’s own website is located at http://jimkouri.us

About The Author Jim Kouri, CPP:
Jim Kouri, CPP is currently fifth vice-president of the National Association of Chiefs of Police and he's a columnist for The Examiner (examiner.com) and New Media Alliance (thenma.org). In addition, he's a blogger for the Cheyenne, Wyoming Fox News Radio affiliate KGAB (www.kgab.com). Kouri also serves as political advisor for Emmy and Golden Globe winning actor Michael Moriarty. He's former chief at a New York City housing project in Washington Heights nicknamed "Crack City" by reporters covering the drug war in the 1980s. In addition, he served as director of public safety at a New Jersey university and director of security for several major organizations. He's also served on the National Drug Task Force and trained police and security officers throughout the country. Kouri writes for many police and security magazines including Chief of Police, Police Times, The Narc Officer and others. He's a news writer and columnist for AmericanDaily.Com, MensNewsDaily.Com, MichNews.Com, and he's syndicated by AXcessNews.Com. Kouri appears regularly as on-air commentator for over 100 TV and radio news and talk shows including Fox News Channel, Oprah, McLaughlin Report, CNN Headline News, MTV, etc. To subscribe to Kouri's newsletter write to COPmagazine@aol.com and write "Subscription" on the subject line.
Website:http://jimkouri.us

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