North Carolina Law Enforcement Finds Success in Tracking Suspects


By: Jim Kouri, CPP

Nearly 30 North Carolina law enforcement agencies have succeeded in locating offenders and wanted suspects without leaving their desks. The agencies are part of a five-county pilot project utilizing an integrated justice solution called JusticeXchange. The computerized service provides law enforcement with up-to-date access to booking records, warrants, and other data from thousands of law enforcement agencies across the country.

The Durham County Sheriff’s Office began using JusticeXchange in 2005 and saw immediate results. The success led Wake, Chatham, Orange, and Granville counties to join the pilot, totaling more than 450 criminal justice users.

Durham Police Sergeant T.J. Johnson spent four months trying to locate a suspect wanted on Federal cocaine trafficking charges. By entering one of the suspect’s aliases in the JusticeXchange system, Johnson found the individual in a Wachula, Florida jail on a DWI charge.

“Federal charges were filed against the suspect and he was returned to the Middle District of North Carolina where he entered a guilty plea and is currently awaiting sentencing,” said Johnson. “JusticeXchange was a major asset in apprehending this wanted fugitive.”

The Greenville Police Department was looking for a felony domestic assault suspect. Officer Johny Isenberg received word the suspect was working in the Clayton or Raleigh area. A search in JusticeXchange showed he had been arrested in Clayton a year earlier and housed in Johnson County Jail. Isenberg contacted the jail and received information on the suspect’s address. Within 24 hours, the individual had been arrested and jailed.

“JusticeXchange is one of the best tools I have found in a long time,” said Isenberg. “Having all of that information in one place is priceless.”

JusticeXchange is also used to locate missing persons, witnesses, and more.

“The ability to share multi-jurisdictional data with the ease of a few simple clicks has significantly improved our ability to monitor, locate, and apprehend offenders,” said Teresa McKinney, division manager of Planning and Development for the Durham County Sheriff’s Office. “During the past 10 months alone, we have seen a 56 percent increase in usage as deputies discover new ways to incorporate this technology to more efficiently meet their responsibilities.”

JusticeXchange is currently being used by law enforcement agencies in Texas, New York, Florida, Washington, Kentucky, Utah, Arkansas, Indiana, South Dakota, Maryland, and Arizona. More than one million searches have been performed by JusticeXchange in the last six years, locating more than 250,000 wanted individuals.

Appriss provides innovative technology solutions that help thousands of local, state, and Federal government agencies serve and protect their citizens. Its flagship product, VINE(R), keeps crime victims informed on the custody and court status of their offender in more than 2,000 communities nationwide. Other innovative services include VINE Protective Order(R), which alerts individuals when a protective order has been served; MethCheck(R), which works with both law enforcement and pharmacies to address the illegal meth lab problem; and AlertXpress(R), a high-speed notification service for government agencies.

Source: Appriss Web site: http://www.appriss.com/

Jim Kouri, CPP is currently fifth vice-president of the National Association of Chiefs of Police and he’s a staff writer for the New Media Alliance (thenma.org). In addition, he’s the new editor for the House Conservatives Fund’s weblog. Kouri also serves as political advisor for Emmy and Golden Globe winning actor Michael Moriarty.

He’s former chief at a New York City housing project in Washington Heights nicknamed “Crack City” by reporters covering the drug war in the 1980s. In addition, he served as director of public safety at a New Jersey university and director of security for several major organizations. He’s also served on the National Drug Task Force and trained police and security officers throughout the country. Kouri writes for many police and security magazines including Chief of Police, Police Times, The Narc Officer and others. He’s a news writer for TheConservativeVoice.Com and PHXnews.com. He’s also a columnist for AmericanDaily.Com, MensNewsDaily.Com, MichNews.Com, and he’s syndicated by AXcessNews.Com. He’s appeared as on-air commentator for over 100 TV and radio news and talk shows including Oprah, McLaughlin Report, CNN Headline News, MTV, Fox News, etc. His book Assume The Position is available at Amazon.Com. Kouri’s own website is located at http://jimkouri.us

About The Author Jim Kouri, CPP:
Jim Kouri, CPP is currently fifth vice-president of the National Association of Chiefs of Police and he's a columnist for The Examiner (examiner.com) and New Media Alliance (thenma.org). In addition, he's a blogger for the Cheyenne, Wyoming Fox News Radio affiliate KGAB (www.kgab.com). Kouri also serves as political advisor for Emmy and Golden Globe winning actor Michael Moriarty. He's former chief at a New York City housing project in Washington Heights nicknamed "Crack City" by reporters covering the drug war in the 1980s. In addition, he served as director of public safety at a New Jersey university and director of security for several major organizations. He's also served on the National Drug Task Force and trained police and security officers throughout the country. Kouri writes for many police and security magazines including Chief of Police, Police Times, The Narc Officer and others. He's a news writer and columnist for AmericanDaily.Com, MensNewsDaily.Com, MichNews.Com, and he's syndicated by AXcessNews.Com. Kouri appears regularly as on-air commentator for over 100 TV and radio news and talk shows including Fox News Channel, Oprah, McLaughlin Report, CNN Headline News, MTV, etc. To subscribe to Kouri's newsletter write to COPmagazine@aol.com and write "Subscription" on the subject line.
Website:http://jimkouri.us

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