Is Sarah Palin Too Good To Be President?


By: David Bozeman

The continued dominance of everything Palin on the national stage does not merit another gushing tribute nor a diatribe against the former governor’s haters (as fun as it would be to write). Furthermore, nothing written here should be construed as pre-emptive excuse peddling for a landslide loss, given Palin’s high unfavorable ratings (which, though real, are not insurmountable — the Dems are afraid of this woman). Simply, the confines of the presidency may prove too narrow for a name that scales new heights (or, to some, plumbs new depths) in ubiquity and provocation. History demanded the clarity and purpose of such men as Washington, Lincoln and Reagan, but Sarah herself may have set her own destiny when, upon resigning as governor of Alaska, she announced that she would speak out for issues and candidates important to her, and, “You don’t need a title to do that.” The iconic images of Sarah the moose-hunter and fisher-woman (many courtesy of her hit TLC show Sarah Palin’s Alaska) and Sarah the tireless, principled and so gosh-darned unpolished campaigner and pundit do not mesh with the duties of the policy wonk in chief, navigating the political terrain, working within the constraints of a one-industry town and facing retirement and decline after a four or eight year apex of public service. Likewise, Teddy Roosevelt, a Republican president with progressive leanings, is as beloved today for his bluster, manliness and war record as he is for his presidential term from 1901-1909.

Palin’s charm and lack of focus-group refinement, two of the most beloved traits to her base, could possibly survive a term or two as president, or the bland Washington culture of compromise, bi-partisanship, protocol and stuffy Washington Post editorials could render her as limp and uninspiring as George W. Bush midway through his administration. Who would be more likely to fill an arena, the 43rd president or the one-time, two and a half year governor? Which words inspire modern conservatism, the drill-baby-drill, profile-away mantra of Sarah Palin or the tedious ramblings of Senator Lisa Murkowski? And most importantly, who is setting the national agenda now, the spirited opposition or the party of the beleaguered president that will not even campaign on their greatest ‘accomplishments’ such as health care reform?

The Palin example of public grace has now been shown by the second generation. Dancing With the Stars finalist and the bona-fide non-diva of the competition Bristol drove her pick-up truck from Alaska to L.A. to appear, and repeatedly proclaimed her newfound confidence to undertake whatever God has in store for her next. Such everyday values are common fodder for liberal entertainers. She could not be any more hated as first daughter (and has apologized on her Facebook page for a rant against her critics), so the family must be striking all the right chords. Dust off your dancing shoes, Willow and Piper, I spot a new television tradition!

The Palins live under unique circumstances, but as to the qualities that count, they are not unique. Self-reliance, competition, faith and family are the instinctive, unspoken values of millions of Americans, and that is what drives her enemies to sputtering rage. The Palins at home in Alaska seem not in the least concerned with whether Harvard-educated idealists in Washington can make their lives better, which is why their example could not likely be replicated thousands of miles away from their beloved home turf. They don’t merely represent the rugged, outdoorsy American spirit — they ARE that spirit.

Sarah Palin forever belongs to political legend. The small-town beauty queen, moose hunter and maverick will surely someday achieve immortality in a Broadway musical. She matters, or else liberals wouldn’t know (or claim to know) intimate details of her life and move in next door to her to find out more! On second thought, a Palin presidency may well be in order. Count her out to your own peril! In 2012, Obama will likely continue the tired mantra of ‘Yes, We Can,’ in contrast to a Palin-inspired Republican platform of ‘Yes, I Can.’

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